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B.C. government announces new mental-health and addiction centre at Riverview lands

November 18th, 2017 | Posted by vimhsadmin in news & views - (Comments Off on B.C. government announces new mental-health and addiction centre at Riverview lands)

east lawn building

The B.C. government will reopen the Riverview psychiatric hospital in Coquitlam as a 105-bed, mental-health and addiction-wellness centre, but the B.C. Schizophrenia Society believes losing the beds at the Burnaby Centre for Mental Health and Addiction is unfortunate.

The new centre is expected to open in late 2019, replacing the current Burnaby Centre for Mental Health and Addiction. The new centre, which was already promised by the former Liberal government in 2015, adds only 11 beds.  Read the rest of this article at The Vancouver Sun…

Image: Ward Perrin/Vancouver Sun

Job Posting: Executive Director, Vancouver Island Mental Health Society

November 3rd, 2017 | Posted by vimhsadmin in news & views - (Comments Off on Job Posting: Executive Director, Vancouver Island Mental Health Society)

Vancouver Island Mental Health Society (VIMHS) is actively recruiting a dynamic and dedicated Executive Director to support the expansion of the Society’s partnership and programming in the context of its mission.

VIMHS is a registered charitable non-profit Society, celebrating its 40th year in providing psychosocial rehabilitation for adults with mental health and addiction concerns, and/or cognitive challenges. VIMHS currently owns and operates five facilities​ ​in​ ​Nanaimo​ ​and​ ​leases​ ​one​ ​facility​ ​in​ ​Campbell​ ​River,​ ​B.C.
Read the job posting here.   Read the job description here.
Resumes will be accepted by email​ ​at​ ​​recruitment@vimhs.org​​ ​until​ ​November​ ​30,​ ​2017.

Invisible angels

October 20th, 2017 | Posted by vimhsadmin in news & views - (Comments Off on Invisible angels)

youngcarers19lf4245Most kids their age would be involved in after-school activities or hanging out at the mall. These adolescents, however, go home to look after a family member with a physical or mental disability. Their contributions are largely unheralded, Elizabeth Renzetti writes, and many have complex needs of their own

Abbigail Wright-Gourlay’s life is different from the average 14-year-old’s. She babysits and has a paper route, two things that are common enough for a teenager. On top of those jobs, though, she has another, much less visible one: She is a caregiver to her twin brother, Andrew.  Read the rest of this article at The Globe and Mail…

October 16th, 2017 | Posted by vimhsadmin in awareness | news & views - (Comments Off on )

Opinion: During Homelessness Action Week, it’s time to take action

October 12th, 2017 | Posted by vimhsadmin in news & views - (Comments Off on Opinion: During Homelessness Action Week, it’s time to take action)

homelessness action weekPrograms which address homelessness first, then provide supports, are more effective and economical than those requiring people to meet milestones (such as sobriety) prior to being housed

Lethargy is an easy pitfall when considering the issue of homelessness in B.C. We have a societal malaise from decades of inadequate government inertia and the feelings of futility that follow. We become accustomed to stepping past our fellow citizens, huddled under awnings and in doorways. We start to accept that this is “just the way things are.”  Read the rest of this article at The Vancouver Sun…

[image: A homeless camp in Vancouver this past summer. NICK PROCAYLO / PNG]

Young adults with autism more likely to have psychiatric problems: study

September 14th, 2017 | Posted by vimhsadmin in news & views | research - (Comments Off on Young adults with autism more likely to have psychiatric problems: study)

main-autism12lf1Researcher suggests findings highlight a need to focus on mental health care for individuals with autism spectrum disorder [photo by Chloe Ellingson/The Globe and Mail]

Kyle Echakowitz says his transition from high school to college was not just stressful, it was downright “scary.” Becoming a postsecondary student meant having to learn how to manage his time, figure out a course load he could handle and advocate for himself. The switch was particularly daunting for Echakowitz, who has Asperger syndrome (now included in the diagnosis for autism spectrum disorder, or ASD), as well as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, anxiety and depression.  Read the rest of this article at The Globe and Mail…