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Love Our Bodies campaign to raise awareness of eating disorders

January 28th, 2016 | Posted by vimhsadmin in people first media

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banner pfrThe love our bodies, love ourselves! movement, brought to you by the Provincial Eating Disorders Awareness campaign, is launched in February with activities and events taking place throughout the year

Eating disorders are a group of mental illnesses that affect the way you feel about food and the way you feel about your body and yourself. There are three main eating disorders: anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder. While these are all called eating disorders, it’s important to remember that these disorders are about much more than food—they’re also about how you feel about yourself, how you cope with your feelings and other deeper factors. [source: CMHA]

It’s very important to get help for an eating disorder because binging, purging and/or severely limiting how much food you eat can cause a lot of serious health problems. But eating disorders are very treatable and many people recover with treatment. Treatment for an eating disorder often includes support from a few different professionals. Regular medical check-ups are also important to treat physical health problems. [source: CMHA]

Amy Pezzente: The Annual Campaign

picture 670The annual B.C. Eating Disorders Awareness Campaign works to raise awareness around prevention and early intervention of eating disorders as well as media literacy, resiliency, building healthy body image and self-esteem. [source: love our bodies]

picture 670aAmy Pezzente works for the Jessie’s Legacy Eating Disorders Prevention Program, where she coordinates British Columbia’s annual Provincial Eating Disorders Awareness (PEDAW) campaign with events and activities taking place year round on disordered eating, self-esteem, and body image.

Amy is also the coordinator for the Looking Glass Foundation for Eating Disorders Online Support Groups. The field of eating disorders holds a very precious and delicate place in Amy’s heart and she has an intense passion for it!

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[Image of Amy Pezzente by Rob Lyons]

Shelley Hine: What are eating disorders?

Eating disorders are not just about food. They are often a way to cope with difficult problems or regain a sense of control. They are complicated illnesses that affect a person’s sense of identity, worth, and self-esteem. [source: CMHA] [image: istockphoto]

picture 671aShelley Hine (MA, RCC) is a Child and Family Therapist and the Coordinator of the Jessie’s Legacy Eating Disorders Prevention Program through Family Services of the North Shore.

Jessie Alexander was a North Shore girl who struggled with an eating disorder for six years and, in 2002, at the age of 20, took her own life due to complications surrounding her eating disorder. Jessie’s hope was to continue to work with children and youth. She hoped that through her work with youth she could prevent others from having to experience the horror of an eating disorder.

Shelley Hine (picture right) is passionate about ensuring that good information on the prevention of eating disorders and disordered eating, on media awareness, on resiliency skills and on health at every size becomes part of the conversation.

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Tyson Busby: Men and Eating Disorders

In the past, eating disorders have been characterized as “women’s problems” and men have been stigmatized from coming forward or have been unaware that they could have an eating disorder. [source: NEDA] [image: istockphoto]

picture 672aTyson Busby is recovered from an eating disorder after living with one for seven years. He now has a family including a 3 year old son and new baby daughter.  As much as possible, he tries to give back with regards to eating disorders in order to offer a sense of hope for others.

Tyson was the first male ever to utilize residential services at Woodstone Residence on Galiano Island (now called The Looking Glass Residence and relocated to Vancouver).  In Tyson’s words, “…going to a residential treatment facility changed my life. I was able to get away from everyday living and just focus on myself which I needed the most.” As a male, Tyson found it difficult to find help for eating disorders as he found a lot of groups were based around females where he wasn’t allowed to participate.  His wife came across The Looking Glass Foundation and from there he was able to access residential care.

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[Image of Tyson Busby by Nikitia Graham Photography]

Ali Eberhardt: Misconceptions and Stigma

Myths about eating disorders can lead to stigma, making it difficult for some individuals to seek treatment and often making it less likely that medical professionals will identify or diagnose eating disorders when they occur outside of the stereotypes. [source: eatingdisorder.org] [image: istockphoto]

picture 673aAli Eberhardt is a Registered Dietitian who holds a Bachelor of Science (Food Nutrition Health) degree from the University of British Columbia. She has been working in the Provincial Eating Disorders Program at St. Paul’s Hospital since 2011.

Ali also spends eight days every summer as the lead dietitian for the Looking Glass Foundation Summer Camp for young girls with eating disorders. She also has her own private practice at ThriveBC where she focuses on helping individuals along the entire spectrum of disordered eating. Ali believes in collaborating with clients to help achieve their goals through a caring and compassionate approach and is passionate about helping clients find a healthy relationship with food & body.

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[Image of Ali Eberhardt by Mint Photography]

 

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