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Land-based service delivery models can enhance hope, belonging, meaning, purpose

February 13th, 2018 | Posted by vimhsadmin in people first media

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people first media mixcloudThe Thunderbird Partnership Foundation is educating Canadians about the importance of land-based service delivery models and the First Nations Mental Wellness Continuum in providing mental health services–and preparing for and responding to crises–in First Nations

Land is and always has been fundamental for the health and cultural identity of Indigenous peoples, playing an essential role in wholistic healing and wellness. The Thunderbird Partnership Foundation participated in several presentations and workshops–and shared information in poster displays–at the 2017 Issues of Substance conference in Calgary, Alberta.

Two poster presentations focused on the importance of culture as the foundation of effective service delivery: the first about the centrality of indigenous land to mental wellness; and the second about valuing cultural protocols with the same integrity as other standards of practice.

Land-Based Service Delivery Models

IOS land basedA Service Delivery Model (SDM) is typically structured with a set of principles, standards, policies, and constraints used to guide the development, deployment, operation, and evaluation of services delivered with the intent to offer a consistent experience to all. A LBSDM would convey principles and standards from an Indigenous lens while ensuring cultural protocols and integrity are valued with the same integrity as standards of practice.

Building upon knowledge gathered for the Honoring our Strengths and the First Nations Mental Wellness Continuum Framework, LBSDM address mental wellness in four areas: Hope, Belonging, Meaning, and Purpose, while using culture as foundation. Eight LBSDM in Canada were assessed.

When the focus of LBSDM is enhancing Hope, Belonging, Meaning, and Purpose, five distinguishing themes were established: 1) Culture as Foundation, 2) Community Development, Ownership, and Capacity Building, 3) Quality Health System and Competent Service Delivery, 4) Collaboration with Partners, and 5) Enhanced Flexible Funding Investments.

Ultimately, if culture is the foundation, then land must be central to mental wellness.

We speak with Sherry Huff, a social media coordinator with Thunderbird Partnership Foundation, about land-based service delivery models.

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First Nation Community Crisis Planning, Prevention, and Response Service Delivery Models

IOS community crisisA Service Delivery Model (SDM) is typically structured with a set of principles, standards, policies, and constraints used to guide the development, deployment, operation, and evaluation of services delivered with the intent to offer a consistent experience to all. A First Nations SDM would convey principles and standards from an Indigenous lens while ensuring cultural protocols and integrity are valued with the same integrity as standards of practice.

The foundation of the CCPPR-SDM uses the First Nations Mental Wellness Continuum (FNMWC) Framework, which promotes a strengths based approach. Most essential to this approach is the belief that people are resourceful and capable of solving their own problems.

When the focus of the CCPPR-SDM is enhancing Hope, Belonging, Meaning, and Purpose, five distinguishing themes were established: 1) Culture as Foundation, 2) Community Development, Ownership, and Capacity Building, 3) Quality Health System and Competent Service Delivery, 4) Collaboration with Partners, and 5) Enhanced Flexible Funding Investments.

First Nation communities have their own unique definition of crisis and capacity to plan, prevent, or respond to events, which must be respected.

We speak with Sherry Huff, a social media coordinator with Thunderbird Partnership Foundation, about First Nation community crisis planning, prevention, and response service delivery models.

771_sherry huff_IOS2017_first nations crisis response_feb 13_2018_40
Left-click to listen; right-click to save.

About Thunderbird Partnership Foundation

thunderbird_logoThe Thunderbird Partnership Foundation is committed to working with First Nations and Inuit to further the capacity of communities to address substance use and addiction. The Foundation promotes a holistic approach to healing and wellness that values culture, respect, community, and compassion. Its top priority is developing a continuum of care that would be available to all Indigenous people in Canada.

The Honouring Our Strengths Renewal Framework document is the framework for this continuum – it outlines community development programs; services for the prevention, early identification, intervention, and treatment of addiction; and the important roles of mental health and well-being in all aspects of care.

Thunderbird Partnership Foundation is also committed to supporting the First Nations Mental Wellness Continuum Framework which is rooted in cultural knowledge and emphasizes First Nations strengths and capacities, building upon the Honouring Our Strengths Renewal Framework. As such, the Foundation’s work is guided by the four components of mental wellness outlined within the First Nations Mental Wellness Continuum Framework: hope, belonging, meaning, and purpose.

The Thunderbird Partnership Foundation is a member of the Wharerātā Group which is an international network of Indigenous leaders working in mental health and addictions. The members share a vision of the near future in which Indigenous peoples sustain their optimal health and wellbeing and contribute to that vision through strategic use of their Indigenous leadership influence on mental health and addictions systems.

Issues of Substance 2017: Addiction Matters

Issues of Substance (IOS) is Canada’s only national conference that brings together addiction workers, healthcare professionals, researchers, policy makers and knowledge brokers from across the country. The premier learning event provides an unparalleled opportunity to share new developments and best practices, and to get practical training related to prevention, harm reduction, treatment and recovery. IOS is also a forum for showcasing new research and knowledge mobilization efforts in the addiction field. The theme for IOS 2017, held November 13-15, 2017 in Calgary (Alberta), was “Addiction Matters.​” The annual conference is hosted by the Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction (CCSA).

About CCSA

CCSA-cmyk-bilThe Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction was created by Parliament to provide national leadership to address substance use in Canada. A trusted counsel, CCSA provides national guidance to decision makers by harnessing the power of research, curating knowledge and bringing together diverse perspectives.

CCSA Vision: a healthier Canadian society where evidence transforms approaches to substance use.
CCSA Mission: to address issues of substance use in Canada by providing national leadership and harnessing the power of evidence to generate coordinated action.

​​​​Together with its partners, CCSA is working to improve the health and safety of Canadians: “We will achieve this goal by nurturing a knowledge exchange environment where research guides policy and evidence-informed actions enhance effectiveness in the field.”

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