There are many roads to homelessness. For Marek Wroblewski, it was schizophrenia. But he didn’t know that at first. “I was manic depressive, they say, I was obsessive compulsive,” he told CTV News. “But it was [actually] schizophrenia, and when [it] hit me, I wasn’t prepared.”
The 59-year-old immigrant arrived in Canada from Poland as a translator and occasional actor. He worked much of his life, but his undiagnosed mental illness plagued him, causing him to make poor decisions that led to his money disappearing as fast as he earned it.
Wroblewski said he ended up in shelters and wandering the streets of downtown Toronto at several points in his life. “I tried to find stairways in a building when it was very cold,” he said. Wroblewski said he would hunch down and try to stay warm. He said being homeless “was humiliating.”
Refuge for Wroblewski came in the form of Dr. Vicky Stergiopoulous, with the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), who was launching a study dubbed At Home/Chez Soi, which looked at the long term effects of a housing-first approach for adults struggling with both mental illness and homelessness. Read the rest of this article at CTV News…
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Image captured from CTV News report (video above)